HomeOn-Demand PublishingSelf-publishingThe changes to self-publishing are just beginning

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The changes to self-publishing are just beginning — 8 Comments

  1. “They are and will be doing everything they can think of to take control back from Amazon.”

    That was always the whole problem. It’s all about control. Now, people with creative talent can easily go straight to market, cutting out the middlemen who take all of the profit. Traditional publishers are going, and good riddance to them. Now they have to find a job where they have to do something productive instead of sitting on a chair drinking coffee while the profits from books often written by long-dead authors pour into their pockets.

  2. Hi David, An interesting insight into the future. Observing the major publishers battling Amazon over the forthcoming years is going to be fascinating. Personally I use Amazon though there is nothing quite like browsing in a real shop for new books. I just wrote this blog post about Amazon’s battle for global publishing dominance that might interest you – http://guyportman.com/2013/07/05/amazons-domination/

  3. Hi Guy,

    I like your post and agree with most of it. My only quibble would be the Fire. I have yet to see any evidence that this will be anywhere near dominant in tablets. So far, it is a poor also ran to the iPad. However, the iBookstore still has a huge distance to cover in book discovery and enjoyable book browsing.

  4. With kindle (fire), I have to say, I love it. They seem to take so much care over the experience and design, and released it at a price everyone can buy, which I also like. Less advantaged families and their children have greater opportunities for reading and learning. And they also seem to be working so hard to support publishers (ie. authors), pretty much every month there are improvements to the publishing tools and methods they offer. iPad, I’m not a fan because of the high price, but I have no experience publishing on iPad, only kindle, so I’m interested to hear from any iPad authors about how the publishing experience is and what they think about price/demographics.

  5. I agree with what you are saying. My problem is Android which is several steps below iOS. Ipad apps are much closer to desktop apps than the iPhone and the iPhone is still quite a bit better than Android.

    The iPad is expensive. I think I’ll go with the mini next. My problem with the Fire is being limited to Kindle. There are many better readers, and many companies with better prices than than Amazon who have their own dedicated ereaders [like CBD: Christian Book Distributors]. I sell my books through all of them. iBooks seems to be the best with the most features supported. Kindles chew them up pretty bad in my Kindle app on the iPad. It may be better on the Fire.

    Economically I suspect the Fire is better, but what happens when someone else passes Amazon. I’ll still have access with my iPad. I doubt you will with your Fire.

  6. Pingback: Self-Publishing: Carnival of the Indies Issue #34 — The Book Designer

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