Bergsland Design and Hackberry fontsBergsland Design and Hackberry fonts is over 40 years old now. I’m an illustrator, graphic designer, font designer, typographer, book designer, marketer, teacher, speaker, and on & on…

Book Shepherd & Mentor

Book production is what I do—unless I am writing—or designing fonts. Bergsland Design and Hackberry fonts has changed a lot since 1967. Increasingly, my focus is on helping authors to produce the print and ebook versions they need to self-publish. For the unique problems faced by Christian authors like myself, please check out Reality Calling.

This site is also the home of the Hackberry font foundry

But back to publishing: the main thing is that publishing has radically changed. The actual publishing and distributing of the books is now free. But, only once you have the copy and artwork ready to upload. You can still go the more traditional route—attempting to get your book into the brick and mortar stores. But for most authors, those venues are down the road a bit. As you begin, you need to get your book released so you can get working on your second book and begin the process of building a name for yourself. As your output develops and matures, you need to make sure it fits in with your plan.

Bergsland Design and Hackberry fonts has grown a great deal.

At this point, my role varies depending upon your need. I can completely shepherd you through the entire process from concept to release. I can help with the marketing after release. As far as actual book production is concerned, I can prepare the book for you to publish, and upload it for you. Or, I can teach you how to do it by mentoring you through the process [with the use of my books].

I’ve been working in publishing production since 1971. In 1991, I began teaching the materials at the college level. Beginning in 1994 I began writing my first textbook, and designing the fonts to be used in its production. Since 2009 I have been writing, producing, and publishing full-time. If you choose me to help, my sharp focus will be on helping you do what you need to do to get your book published.

I received this testimony from an evangelist I have worked with for many years:

Thank you for all the great publishing work you have done for our ministry. You have helped us to produce professional-looking books and products that have been a blessing and benefit to many people. I have recommended your publishing service to a number of people and each one comes back with the same report—they are very happy with your work and have enjoyed working with you. You are doing a great job helping many of us to bring forth the vision that is within our hearts and out onto the printed page where it can be read and received into the hearts of men and women. It reminds me of the skilled workmen who God anointed in the Old Testament to craft the tabernacle and its instruments so that God could have a place to dwell among men. Likewise, God has anointed you as a skilled workman to craft books and materials that can bring forth the presence of God in this New Testament dispensation. You are truly an asset to the Body of Christ.

Tom Shanklin • World Evangelism Fellowship • PO Box 4144 • Mankato, MN 56002 • Website: www.tomshanklin.org

Recent posts from Bergsland Design and Hackberry Fonts

I post on books, indie publishing, typography, book design, font design, and industry news.

Inexpensive German vanity press tredition?

Here’s a link to a German self-publishing house that now is available in the US. It is a company named tredition. It seems like an inexpensive German vanity press — or maybe not. As usual, the devil is in the details. I imagine … Continue reading →

Briskly: new font release for Fall 2016

I’ve put this off for years, but it just seemed time. Briskly: new font release is a font made from one sample of my handwriting. An ASCII font (256-character), it will work well for desktop, Web, and ePUB. The only place you will … Continue reading →

Converting Books to Ebooks with InDesign CC

Book designers often dread converting books to ebooks — the process of changing a greyscale printed book to various full-color ebooks: downloadable PDFs, ePUB FXL and Reflow, & Kindle books of various flavors from e-ink to large Fire tablet. It … Continue reading →

Reedsy simple book formatting & free!

I received this email today from the Skilled Workman contact form: From Martin at Reedsy simple book formatting: “I’m part of the team behind the Reedsy Book Editor, an online tool that helps independent authors write, collaborate on, and format their projects. … Continue reading →

Printing consolidation necessary to survive

Printing consolidation necessary: Xerox buying R.R. Donnelley This is all part of the consolidation necessary to make these hugely expensive presses run. Hardware prices make printing consolidation necessary. The article in Publishing Executive only covers magazines. But it goes much further than … Continue reading →

Where is the future of books?

I just posted a link to this article from The Bookseller: stating the digital revolution is definitely not over. Of course, that is one of those DUH! facts. The future of books is even more complex than you may think, … Continue reading →

Amazon still doing Kindle book modification

I received this in an email from Aaron Shepard this morning. I didn’t get permission to copy this, but I’ve done what I can to make sure you know this is Aaron’s writing. Evidently, Kindle book modification is still a problem after they … Continue reading →

Color e-ink paperwhite: coming soon?

Gizmag has an interesting article today about color e-Ink. They claim it will not have any impact on ereaders. I hope they are wrong. Paperwhites, and their ilk, are one of the largest drags of ebook publishing today. They are … Continue reading →


Comments

Welcome to Bergsland Design and Hackberry fonts — 5 Comments

  1. I just wanted you to know that I’ve put something in your mailbox.

    However, the real reason is to have an excuse to get another glimpse of the wonderful font you use to re-display this message which is being displayed as Courier as I type. I am curious and wonder what the name is and whether or not it is one of your creations.
    The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
    Jackdaws love my big sphinx of quartz.

  2. I wish I could help. I really have no idea what is used for the comments. I just looked through the CSS, but I cannot see which font is used for comments. Sorry.

  3. Hi, Bought your book ‘Writing in Indesign 2.5’.
    Read it once, went over it many times … I’ll get it
    sooner or later. But couldn’t figure this one out.

    Do you write your books in ONE BIG DOCUMENT?
    I couldn’t find where you assemble chapters together.

    BTW: I’m using Indesign 6 … is it worth going to indesign cc?
    I hate having to pay for the same software over and over again.
    I should OWN Microsoft Word by this point with all the updated
    versions.

    Oh yea, Tried to sign onto your list … there’s a problem
    When I try to confirm, I get a white page with a reason I can’t
    subscribe

  4. Hi John,

    Yes, I write my books in one big document. Ten years ago or so, I was forced to break them up because InDesign simply couldn’t handle the file sizes I was using. it was a real pain, as I was always wanting to move a page from one chapter to another. On top of that, dealing with 15-20 chapters felt like herding cats. I had no trouble getting things to work. It just was not pleasant and straight forward for me. Many like it—especially if they have different people dealing with different portions of a book.

    However, starting with InDesign 5.5 (as I remember, I think), It was possible to go back and do everything in one document. However, WiInD 2.5 was done with CS6. I looked at the files, and this is where it started with larger pieces (A-F, plus an index), and I finally put it all together into one file with no problems.

    The primary reason was to facilitate the production of ebooks. Kindle’s plug-in for InDesign didn’t work well with the Book Panel.

    Cs6 was really the first version which made a halfway decent ebook. The ePUBs were OK, and Kindle’s plug-in made good Kindle books. However, CC has really added a lot more power into the ebook production workflow. Now the ePUBs produced are better than the hand-coded variety, in most cases. And the fixed layout ePUB FXL can be really handy, plus the now built-in Publish Online capability.

    So, yes, I think CC is necessary. I realize the $20 a month is a pain, but there’s no way round it. For Photoshop, Illustrator and the rest, CS6 seems to work fine. However, I do find I am gradually downloading the most recent versions of PS, AI, Acrobat, and InD. I no longer have to use Dreamweaver, Flash and the rest—for which I am grateful.

    I’m not sure what the sign-up problem is. No one else has reported any problems, and there are now over 700 people who get the posts via email.

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